Whereas: • the STVM promotes animal health globally; • the STVM recognizes that human’s actions toward domestic and wild animals influence human health and disease in dramatic ways, especially in tropical regions markedly affected by human’s interventions; • zoonoses can, by definition, infect both animals and humans; • the majority of the emerging infectious diseases, including those potentially arising through bioterrorism, are zoonoses; • conservation medicine is the science integrating animal and human health with the health of ecological systems, including that affected by human’s actions; • by their very nature, the fields of human medicine and veterinary medicine are complementary and synergistic in confronting, controlling, and preventing zoonotic diseases from infecting across species; • collaboration and communication between human medicine and veterinary medicine have been limited in recent decades; • better collaboration and communication are needed to address many issues, among others, animal-transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in humans, protection against highly pathogenic avian influenza, nontherapeutic use in animals of antimicrobials that are also used in humans, policies on the use of animals in research, medical education, product safety testing, and xenotransplantation; • the challenges of the 21st century demand that human and veterinary medical professionals work together;

 

 

Whereas: • the STVM promotes animal health globally; • the STVM recognizes that human’s actions toward domestic and wild animals influence human health and disease in dramatic ways, especially in tropical regions markedly affected by human’s interventions; • zoonoses can, by definition, infect both animals and humans; • the majority of the emerging infectious diseases, including those potentially arising through bioterrorism, are zoonoses; • conservation medicine is the science integrating animal and human health with the health of ecological systems, including that affected by human’s actions; • by their very nature, the fields of human medicine and veterinary medicine are complementary and synergistic in confronting, controlling, and preventing zoonotic diseases from infecting across species; • collaboration and communication between human medicine and veterinary medicine have been limited in recent decades; • better collaboration and communication are needed to address many issues, among others, animal-transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in humans, protection against highly pathogenic avian influenza, nontherapeutic use in animals of antimicrobials that are also used in humans, policies on the use of animals in research, medical education, product safety testing, and xenotransplantation; • the challenges of the 21st century demand that human and veterinary medical professionals work together;